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How I Used the Animedoro Method for My Virtual Internship

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Sep 17, 2021

Just because the Pomodoro method is the most popular, it doesn’t mean it works for everyone.

Nothing compares to the rush you get applying to virtual internships! If you know, you know. Opening LinkedIn and saving every opening that you’re even slightly interested in, I’m getting chills just thinking about it, not gonna lie. Whether you’re exploring new opportunities to build your resume, gain some experience, or to fulfill a school requirement, it’s something I’m sure even just looking for a virtual internship is something you’ve thought about at least once. 

What is a virtual internship?

Virtual internships are also something you can think about applying for now that we’re all stuck at home. Admit it, only thinking about your modules and Zoom class schedules can get really boring, even if you have some orgs here and there. It’s time to make some lemonade out of the lemons this panini has given us! Virtual internships can be really convenient too since you don’t have to think about the logistical issues you’d probably have to face if we weren’t in quarantine. 

This quarantine, productivity methods have been gaining a lot of traction due to the almost non-existent boundaries between work and leisure. For those of us working at home, the places we used to associate with rest and relaxation are now burdened with never-ending deadlines and stress we can no longer physically distance (no pun intended) ourselves from. The most popular productivity method out there has to be the Pomodoro method (not the pasta). When you do the Pomodoro method, you work for 25 minutes then take a 5 minute break, then a longer 15-30 minute break after finishing four cycles, then it starts all over again.

What is Animedoro?

Almost everyone has heard of Pomodoro. It’s reliable, and all over the internet. It’s the cheese quesadilla of Mexican restaurants. You might have not heard of the Animedoro method, at least not recently. Animedoro was Josh Chen’s super secret studying method until he posted the first and only video about it at the time last January. He said that this is the method that allowed him to watch 13 days worth of anime (yes, 300 hours, he did the math) while maintaining a 4.0 GPA. The premise of the animedoro method is to do 40 to 60 minutes of work, and taking an estimated 19 to 20 minute break by watching an episode of anime or a sitcom, not including the intro and outro of the show. He says to start the timer at 60 minutes and to simply follow the natural flow of your assignment or task at hand. With the Animedoro method, he says that you’re less likely to get cut off in the middle of your work and you’ll have more enjoyable breaks.

How will the Animedoro method help me with my virtual internship?

I, in my desperate need to feel like I was on top of my to do list, decided to try it out. I was struggling to juggle school, my two virtual internships, responsibilities at home, and org work. This was all while I was trying to maintain whatever sanity the pandemic had left me, of course. I found that I was trying so hard to ‘stay productive’ for stretches of time that were way too long and stopped doing things that actually sparked joy within me and refueled me. 

I’m not an anime type of gal, so I started out watching sitcom episodes instead. My mind was BLOWN. I was so, so shocked to find out that this actually worked for me. I didn’t dread facing my responsibilities as much, and instead found myself more motivated to finish what I had to do because I liked what it felt like to reward myself with my longer break afterwards. Eventually, Animedoro sort of became my way of life. My sitcom episodes ended up evolving into anything that made me happy, which ranged from watching my comfort Youtubers, getting some reading time in, or even a Fortnite match. I finally struck the balance between my virtual internship, school, extracurriculars, as well as my own leisure and relaxation time. As a result, working on my thesis, thinking of what to cook for dinner, and using my last remaining brain cells on my virtual internship, and crushing my to-do list became less of something that I was afraid to start and more of something I was excited to do because I knew that in the middle of the chaos was a fun (not so) little break. 

Animedoro vs Pomodoro

So, how do these two methods compare? Let’s break it down. The traditional Pomodoro method has you work for 25 minutes, then you take a 5 minute break. After completing four cycles, you take a longer 15 to 30 minute break before starting over. The Animedoro method’s 40 to 60 minute time frame follows the flow of your work more naturally. Josh Chen says that this way you won’t have to put in half-baked effort into your tasks just to fill up the time. After working, you get to reward yourself with a 20 minute break every single time. While the Pomodoro might work for people who have a shorter attention span, realistically speaking, the 25 minutes you take being productive also includes the minutes you spend setting up the perfect work environment, shaking your iced coffee to listen to the ice cubes swim around, and choosing the perfect playlist to set the mood. Next thing you know, you only have half the time left to work on your final paper or getting back to your virtual internship tasks before your next break.

In his video, Josh Chen does the math so we don’t have to (bless his soul, am I right?), and it turns out the work/break ratio of the Pomodoro versus the Animedoro is 2.86 mins/1min and (2-3) min/1 min respectively. So, while you could be getting more work done with the Animedoro method, Josh said his goal was never to be a productivity god, but to find a way to enjoy the studying process, which is exactly what he gets with Animedoro since he doesn’t get cut off in the middle of work and takes more relaxing breaks. 

Art by Shai Libunao

 

Written By:

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Andie Vitug

Andie Vitug is currently a student at DLSU, majoring in Development Studies and minoring in Philosophy (but don’t ask about the second one, ½ jk). In her free time, she makes bomb tuna melt sandwiches and tries to make the most out of her YouTube premium subscription (no, it’s not as impractical as people think).

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